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  • #31
    The University of Minnesota will freeze tuition for most students at its five campuses in the next academic year.

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    • #32
      Originally posted by laker View Post
      The University of Minnesota will freeze tuition for most students at its five campuses in the next academic year.
      That was nice of them. You'd never see that here in California. Tuition goes up every couple of years, but it's never gone down to my knowledge. Kudos to the University of Minnesota.
      Last edited by crixus; 04-25-2020, 01:02 AM.
      Bring back Humboldt State football.

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      • #33
        More university presidents are saying no sports in the Fall:

        https://www.espn.com/college-footbal...answers-needed

        Comment


        • #34
          Originally posted by cwfenn View Post
          More university presidents are saying no sports in the Fall:

          https://www.espn.com/college-footbal...answers-needed
          Curious question. If there is no football, are scholarships still in effect ? How about non-crowd sports like cross country and golf?

          Comment


          • #35
            Originally posted by laker View Post

            D3 MacMurray closed about a week or so ago- not sure if that was from the virus or something else.
            This is MacMurray College in Illinois, not McMurry University in Abilene, Texas (for those keeping track at home):

            https://www.sj-r.com/news/20200327/m...fter-174-years

            After years of financial struggles, MacMurray College will close its doors at the end of the spring semester, the college announced Friday.

            Charles O’Connell, chairman of MacMurray’s board of trustees, said there simply was no viable financial path forward for the four-year liberal arts college, citing declining enrollments, rising competitive costs, and an insufficient endowment as major factors in the decision.

            ...

            Despite its long history, the college struggled in recent years.

            In 2016, it was placed on probation by the Higher Learning Commission “because of concerns related to governance, assessment of student learning, institutional resources, planning, and performance improvement.”

            The probation, which could have meant loss of accreditation and eligibility for federal financial aid and other programs, was lifted in July 2018 after a full review by the HLC.


            Faculty and staff had been working to create a new and sustainable business model for the college that would have broadened its professional degree programs and reached out to more non-traditional students.

            ...

            O’Connell said the pandemic and subsequent economic disruption were factors that complicated the college’s recent financial position, but were not the main reasons for the closure.
            Cal U (Pa.) Class of 2014

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            • #36
              Three Vermont schools have gotten a reprieve from possibly closing- Vermont Tech, Northern Vermont-Johnson and Northern Vermont-Lyndon.

              I suppose they could merge the three and call it Vermont Lyndon-Johnson Tech...........

              https://www.wcax.com/content/news/VS...569960551.html

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              • #37
                Originally posted by laker View Post
                Three Vermont schools have gotten a reprieve from possibly closing- Vermont Tech, Northern Vermont-Johnson and Northern Vermont-Lyndon.

                I suppose they could merge the three and call it Vermont Lyndon-Johnson Tech...........

                https://www.wcax.com/content/news/VS...569960551.html
                Lyndon's Johnson School of Technology - Vermont.

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                • #38
                  According to this article, Vermont had 4* colleges close in 2019. The intellectual entity that is Marlboro College will merge with Emerson College in Boston, but the physical campus in Vermont was recently listed for sale.

                  https://www.wgbh.org/news/education/...-economy-slips

                  The trend I've noticed with schools closing is they seem to be small, private, liberal arts colleges that are unremarkable academically. We've got about 50 of those in Minnesota, so it's going to be interesting to see what happens here in the next 10 years.

                  EDIT: For those interested, I found this tracker that lists school closures and mergers. They're pretty loose with the terms though. Doesn't look like Henderson State is going away even though this list makes it seem like they are.

                  https://www.educationdive.com/news/t...dation/539961/
                  Last edited by SW_Mustang; 04-28-2020, 02:07 PM.

                  Comment


                  • #39
                    Originally posted by SW_Mustang View Post
                    According to this article, Vermont had 4* colleges close in 2019. The intellectual entity that is Marlboro College will merge with Emerson College in Boston, but the physical campus in Vermont was recently listed for sale.

                    https://www.wgbh.org/news/education/...-economy-slips

                    The trend I've noticed with schools closing is they seem to be small, private, liberal arts colleges that are unremarkable academically. We've got about 50 of those in Minnesota, so it's going to be interesting to see what happens here in the next 10 years.

                    EDIT: For those interested, I found this tracker that lists school closures and mergers. They're pretty loose with the terms though. Doesn't look like Henderson State is going away even though this list makes it seem like they are.

                    https://www.educationdive.com/news/t...dation/539961/
                    Very informative site, thanks. Curious how Minn. is able to sustain a system of apparently 30 some state colleges with a population of only 5.7M. Are they the cause of what appears to be the demise of small liberal arts institutions in the state?

                    Comment


                    • #40
                      Originally posted by SW_Mustang View Post
                      According to this article, Vermont had 4* colleges close in 2019. The intellectual entity that is Marlboro College will merge with Emerson College in Boston, but the physical campus in Vermont was recently listed for sale.

                      https://www.wgbh.org/news/education/...-economy-slips

                      The trend I've noticed with schools closing is they seem to be small, private, liberal arts colleges that are unremarkable academically. We've got about 50 of those in Minnesota, so it's going to be interesting to see what happens here in the next 10 years.

                      EDIT: For those interested, I found this tracker that lists school closures and mergers. They're pretty loose with the terms though. Doesn't look like Henderson State is going away even though this list makes it seem like they are.

                      https://www.educationdive.com/news/t...dation/539961/
                      Four colleges closing in one year in a state with a small population like Vermont is very depressing. Thanks for sharing the article though, it's good to stay informed.
                      Bring back Humboldt State football.

                      Comment


                      • #41
                        Originally posted by crixus View Post

                        Four colleges closing in one year in a state with a small population like Vermont is very depressing. Thanks for sharing the article though, it's good to stay informed.
                        You are very welcome!

                        Lyndon State and Johnson State merged under one administrative umbrella in 2018 to form Northern Vermont University. Each campus is semi-autonomous - for example, they both retained their athletic departments. If NVU was to close as well as the tech school, it would be like losing seven schools in two years. Technically, since LSC and JSC no longer exist, they'd have lost nine schools in five years. That's pretty bonkers.

                        Comment


                        • #42
                          Originally posted by CALUPA69 View Post

                          Very informative site, thanks. Curious how Minn. is able to sustain a system of apparently 30 some state colleges with a population of only 5.7M. Are they the cause of what appears to be the demise of small liberal arts institutions in the state?
                          Minnesota has a very extensive number of community colleges which were merged with the technical schools. At one time the philosophy was to have a school (or a branch) within a 35 mile circle. Of course that wasn't meant for the northern part of the state but if you drew a circle on a map around each of these public schools you would see that it covered quite an area.

                          There are two public school systems in MN. The University of Minnesota, with Twin Cities being the only D1 school in the state, Duluth and Crookston D2 and Morris D3. Then you have the state system which would include D2 Bemidji, Mankato, Moorhead, St Cloud, Southwest, Winona. Concordia St Paul is private but also D2. The two year/technical schools are in this system.

                          The private schools are basically two conferences- the MIAC with traditionally bigger and more athletic accomplishments and the UMAC. St Thomas, who is trying to move up to D1, and St John's are the most well know.

                          https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_o...s_in_Minnesota

                          Comment


                          • #43
                            Originally posted by CALUPA69 View Post

                            Very informative site, thanks. Curious how Minn. is able to sustain a system of apparently 30 some state colleges with a population of only 5.7M. Are they the cause of what appears to be the demise of small liberal arts institutions in the state?
                            I should clarify, we aren't seeing a ton of closures in Minnesota just yet. But yes - our system is wildly unsustainable. The trends I'm seeing are really just in the Northeast, but it's starting to affect the Mid-South as well as the Northwest. I think our time will come, and coronavirus may very well speed things up. I'll give you the details but the tl;dr is something has to change kinda quickly.

                            We have a total of 43 public colleges operating 60+ campuses, depending on what's counted as a "campus." 11 of which are universities. The other 32 colleges are community, technical, and tribal schools, all but one of which are run by Minnesota State. As I understand it, a lot of these schools were vocational schools run by their respective districts. The demand for higher education grew, so a lot of them started offering 2-year degrees. Through consolidation and legislation in the mid-1990s, a lot of them were transformed into what we have today.

                            On the private side, Wikipedia lists us as having 31 private non-profit institutions, which may or may not be correct. That number doesn't include other campuses, however - just the schools themselves. So in total - there are close too, or over, 100 physical locations to get a degree from a non-profit institution in Minnesota.

                            The biggest problem I see - the bulk of our schools are academically homogenized. It's the same degrees with the same quality of instruction. If you're not attending the University of Minnesota, Mayo, or Macalester, odds are that degree program is the same at just about every school. There are very few actual research opportunities outside of the U's flagship campus, for one example. This means social hierarchy and party culture dominates which schools get the students - not unlike any other state, but I think it runs rampant here. St. John's and St. Thomas are really unremarkable universities - they mean nothing to the greater world of higher ed like Harvard or Yale does, yet they are at the top of the food chain despite having no unique qualities to them.

                            Lastly, one issue not a lot of people seem to notice - that count I posted of 74 schools, that's what's in the physical borders of Minnesota. That doesn't count the University of North Dakota, North Dakota State University, South Dakota State University, or any of the smaller schools on the Dakota border.These schools are very popular with students who want the "big" school experience, but couldn't get into the U. Each of them are bigger than our second largest university, and because of reciprocity agreements the in-state tuition applies to Minnesota residents. This exists to an extent on the Wisconsin side as well, but it's not nearly as big of a student-stealer as the Dakotas are. There might be more Bison fans in Minnesota than there are in North Dakota.

                            I can't speak for every school, but SMSU relies heavily on international and non-traditional students, especially the online ones. We also rely heavily on our athletic department to bring in students. I don't know how some of these schools are still operating, maybe they have really dedicated alumni bases. Who knows.

                            Comment


                            • #44
                              Originally posted by laker View Post

                              Minnesota has a very extensive number of community colleges which were merged with the technical schools. At one time the philosophy was to have a school (or a branch) within a 35 mile circle. Of course that wasn't meant for the northern part of the state but if you drew a circle on a map around each of these public schools you would see that it covered quite an area.

                              There are two public school systems in MN. The University of Minnesota, with Twin Cities being the only D1 school in the state, Duluth and Crookston D2 and Morris D3. Then you have the state system which would include D2 Bemidji, Mankato, Moorhead, St Cloud, Southwest, Winona. Concordia St Paul is private but also D2. The two year/technical schools are in this system.

                              The private schools are basically two conferences- the MIAC with traditionally bigger and more athletic accomplishments and the UMAC. St Thomas, who is trying to move up to D1, and St John's are the most well know.

                              https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_o...s_in_Minnesota
                              Granite Falls, Canby, and Jackson all got community colleges. It's not working out from what I've been told.

                              Rochester got RCTC and UMR - which is less than what Bemidji and Duluth have. Just a weird anomaly.

                              Comment


                              • #45
                                Originally posted by SW_Mustang View Post

                                Granite Falls, Canby, and Jackson all got community colleges. It's not working out from what I've been told.

                                Rochester got RCTC and UMR - which is less than what Bemidji and Duluth have. Just a weird anomaly.
                                Too much duplication of effort. I think in Wisconsin those D3 schools in the UW system tend to specialize. With distance learning some of those places will get shut down.

                                Comment

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