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  • 1. Wabbot 9 that is probably the most logical and intelligent analysis I have seen within the last 6 months. I completely agree.

    2. Mr. Mustang, you are in my thoughts and prayers. I can the pandemic has taken a toll on you. All the best.

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    • The Colonial Athletic Conference will cancel fall football according to Bruce Feldman.
      Last edited by catatonic; 07-18-2020, 06:14 AM.

      Comment


      • Originally posted by SW_Mustang View Post

        It's really a matter of perspective I guess. From what I've been told, our enrollment (year-to-year) is going to be better than the other MnSCU 7. The eSports program also ballooned more than originally expected. There's also the tenants in SS, they aren't going anywhere.

        We don't get any revenue from sports anyway. It will be a financial blow in other areas - certainly, but not bad enough to where we can't recover.
        If tyhere are no sports the effect on enrollment will be devatstating. I'll just leave it at that. It's unfortunante so few in the University truly grasp the severity of it .

        Comment


        • Originally posted by Wildcat Khan View Post

          I 'm not sure I agree with this for one reason, researchers are making progress and last week a possible vaccine went into the 3rd phase of testing. Getting a vaccine is the real key and by reports they should have something between December and February. To me, that is a major change in the next 12 months and note that Hoiberg in the B1G tournament had what was the last pandemic of this scale worldwide, Influenza or as it was referred to once the Spanish Flu and we thought nothing about it despite it killing 50 million worldwide and infecting around 500 million for a much higher death rate in the outbreak of 1918.

          https://www.history.com/news/1918-am...otten-pandemic for information on the Spanish flu and I think something all the media and government people talking about the flu need to read. It gives hope as we recovered, but also has a look at what not to do too.
          You seem much more confident in a vaccine that I am. In addition the mass hysteria promoted with this makes starting up extremely unlikely. Even things are much better than 2-3 months ago we are now demanding masks and more lockdowns. Folks aren't interested in facts they are interested in hysteria

          Comment


          • Originally posted by UMary1 View Post
            1. Wabbot 9 that is probably the most logical and intelligent analysis I have seen within the last 6 months. I completely agree.

            2. Mr. Mustang, you are in my thoughts and prayers. I can the pandemic has taken a toll on you. All the best.
            Since I made my initial comments, several D1 and several D2 conferences have announced the cancellation of fall sports. I am fine. I am also a realist and understand the folks in charge are scared. Looks like my predictions are spot on things are unlikely to happen. With the present leadership out there (folks of all political persuasion), the lanscape of our economy has been changed forever. The service industry of bars, hotels, and restaurants has been permanently damaged and perhaps destroyed long term.

            I wish things would happen. Kids need it for their mental health. Schools need it for a vibrant campus and fiscal sustainability. College towns need it for survival. Unfortunately, fear and politics has won out over common sense.

            Comment


            • Originally posted by MrMustang View Post

              If tyhere are no sports the effect on enrollment will be devatstating. I'll just leave it at that. It's unfortunante so few in the University truly grasp the severity of it .
              Yes, shutting down the athletics department permanently would close the school overnight.

              That's not what's going to happen right now. The athletes aren't being forced out. They're still SMSU students unless they choose not to be. We may lose a few... but I'm not worried. I guess we'll wait and see.

              Comment


              • Originally posted by MrMustang View Post

                You seem much more confident in a vaccine that I am. In addition the mass hysteria promoted with this makes starting up extremely unlikely. Even things are much better than 2-3 months ago we are now demanding masks and more lockdowns. Folks aren't interested in facts they are interested in hysteria
                Well, the vaccine is in the last phase of testing. I even saw a story about major testing in San Antonio about wanting people to test the vaccine, so I do have confidence in our medical professionals.

                I will agree about the hysteria and getting tired of the news lieing about this being the most deadly pandemic in US history. If they say in the last 100 years that is true, but this is nothing like 1918 where 50 million died worldwide from Influenza. Even then, a vaccine was created in about a year though. I also think the current surge is from BBQ's and Fireworks two weeks ago and why I support the places saying no tailgating.

                Comment


                • Originally posted by Wildcat Khan View Post

                  Well, the vaccine is in the last phase of testing. I even saw a story about major testing in San Antonio about wanting people to test the vaccine, so I do have confidence in our medical professionals.

                  I will agree about the hysteria and getting tired of the news lieing about this being the most deadly pandemic in US history. If they say in the last 100 years that is true, but this is nothing like 1918 where 50 million died worldwide from Influenza. Even then, a vaccine was created in about a year though. I also think the current surge is from BBQ's and Fireworks two weeks ago and why I support the places saying no tailgating.
                  Wouldn't put too much faith in a vaccine since initial surveys indicate we would need about 100% participation rate of the population who will even consider getting the vaccination. The anti-vaxxer movement will keep 20-30% from even considering this possible solution.

                  Comment


                  • Originally posted by CALUPA69 View Post
                    Wouldn't put too much faith in a vaccine since initial surveys indicate we would need about 100% participation rate of the population who will even consider getting the vaccination. The anti-vaxxer movement will keep 20-30% from even considering this possible solution.
                    At that point, it would be their own fault for getting sick. Just like not having the flu shot every year which I'll admit I forgot this year. That's why I don't blame anyone but me for getting the flu this January. I know that can sound crass, but I feel the same way also about the people going to Covid parties such as the students at Alabama which of course could effect the football team.

                    Comment


                    • Per Brett McMurphy, the SWAC will announce on Monday that it is canceling fall sports.

                      Comment


                      • The powers that be just need to end this and call off fall sports. This country is in complete disarray and in perhaps denial about this whole thing. We certainly have our priorities all messed up when pro athletes can get tested and have results back almost immediately versus the general public waiting in line for hours and not getting results back for up to 2 weeks. It's time to be proactive instead of reactive. Missouri St. spent $26k testing just football players. That's Missouri St., not Clemson, LSU, Alabama, etc. What are they spending? Maybe they can handle that type of expense. What's the expense going to be when the rest of the athletes get back to campus? Front line people are tired, stressed to the max and overworked. In that type of working condition, mistakes get made, bad mistakes. The time has come and gone to start making tough decisions to deal with this pandemic and get it under control.
                        Go Hounds!
                        B-E-A-R-C-A-T-S
                        Cyclone Power

                        Comment


                        • Originally posted by Wildcat Khan View Post

                          Well, the vaccine is in the last phase of testing. I even saw a story about major testing in San Antonio about wanting people to test the vaccine, so I do have confidence in our medical professionals.

                          I will agree about the hysteria and getting tired of the news lieing about this being the most deadly pandemic in US history. If they say in the last 100 years that is true, but this is nothing like 1918 where 50 million died worldwide from Influenza. Even then, a vaccine was created in about a year though. I also think the current surge is from BBQ's and Fireworks two weeks ago and why I support the places saying no tailgating.
                          Regarding the 1918 vaccine - It was widely regarded to have been ineffective, as it was based on the premise that the flu was a bacteria, not a virus.
                          I think it is not useful to compare COVID-19 to the 1918 spanish flu.
                          1. Just look at the differences in the quality and technology of medical care. Despite all of this technology, 6% of those infected with COVID-19 between 60-69 will die, rising to 12% between 70 and 79.
                          2. It is a very expensive way to die, given today's medical costs. Insurance rates will rise significantly for all of us as a result
                          3. Much more contagious than flu.
                          4. Some folks have lasting side effects (e.g., COVID toes).
                          5. Apparently, the antibodies aren't permanent - you can get it again.


                          Here is the article about 1918 vaccine.

                          https://www.historyofvaccines.org/co...nt-spanish-flu

                          Certainly none of the vaccines described above prevented viral influenza infection – we know now that influenza is caused by a virus, and none of the vaccines protected against it. But were any of them protective against the bacterial infections that developed secondary to influenza? Vaccinologist Stanley A. Plotkin, MD, thinks they were not. He told us, “The bacterial vaccines developed for Spanish influenza were probably ineffective because at the time it was not known that pneumococcal bacteria come in many, many serotypes and that of the bacterial group they called B. influenzae, only one type is a major pathogen.” In other words, the vaccine developers had little ability to identify, isolate, and produce all the potential disease-causing strains of bacteria circulating at the time. Indeed, today’s pneumococcal vaccine for children protects against 13 serotypes of that bacteria, and the vaccine for adults protects against 23 serotyp

                          Comment


                          • Originally posted by Columbuseer View Post

                            Regarding the 1918 vaccine - It was widely regarded to have been ineffective, as it was based on the premise that the flu was a bacteria, not a virus.
                            I think it is not useful to compare COVID-19 to the 1918 spanish flu.
                            1. Just look at the differences in the quality and technology of medical care. Despite all of this technology, 6% of those infected with COVID-19 between 60-69 will die, rising to 12% between 70 and 79.
                            2. It is a very expensive way to die, given today's medical costs. Insurance rates will rise significantly for all of us as a result
                            3. Much more contagious than flu.
                            4. Some folks have lasting side effects (e.g., COVID toes).
                            5. Apparently, the antibodies aren't permanent - you can get it again.


                            Here is the article about 1918 vaccine.

                            https://www.historyofvaccines.org/co...nt-spanish-flu

                            Certainly none of the vaccines described above prevented viral influenza infection – we know now that influenza is caused by a virus, and none of the vaccines protected against it. But were any of them protective against the bacterial infections that developed secondary to influenza? Vaccinologist Stanley A. Plotkin, MD, thinks they were not. He told us, “The bacterial vaccines developed for Spanish influenza were probably ineffective because at the time it was not known that pneumococcal bacteria come in many, many serotypes and that of the bacterial group they called B. influenzae, only one type is a major pathogen.” In other words, the vaccine developers had little ability to identify, isolate, and produce all the potential disease-causing strains of bacteria circulating at the time. Indeed, today’s pneumococcal vaccine for children protects against 13 serotypes of that bacteria, and the vaccine for adults protects against 23 serotyp
                            I'm not talking about the 1918 vaccine and have read that article. We now however don't have to worry about it and even let coaches coach B1G tournament games with it. I think there is too much fear that we will never find a way to combat covid as well as fear that we won't have a 100% effective vaccine. I saw a report though on CNN about that last part, measles has the best effectiveness of a vaccine and it is at 97%. The common cold though we can't stop at all.

                            You also hit something well that I've been trying to get across, medical technology is much better today. It shouldn't take our researchers nearly as long to isolate and that we are entering phase 3 of testing vaccines just 4 months after this ballooned in the US should give some hope. We also have much better technology to mass produce and mass distribute a vaccine compared to 1918 when train travel was the fastest travel available.

                            On the topic of deaths, too many are because people seek medical attention way too late. Locally most of our initial deaths from the ICU were from people that needed ICU at admittance and didn't seek help until symptoms became dire.

                            Comment


                            • Originally posted by Wildcat Khan View Post

                              I'm not talking about the 1918 vaccine and have read that article. We now however don't have to worry about it and even let coaches coach B1G tournament games with it. I think there is too much fear that we will never find a way to combat covid as well as fear that we won't have a 100% effective vaccine. I saw a report though on CNN about that last part, measles has the best effectiveness of a vaccine and it is at 97%. The common cold though we can't stop at all.

                              You also hit something well that I've been trying to get across, medical technology is much better today. It shouldn't take our researchers nearly as long to isolate and that we are entering phase 3 of testing vaccines just 4 months after this ballooned in the US should give some hope. We also have much better technology to mass produce and mass distribute a vaccine compared to 1918 when train travel was the fastest travel available.

                              On the topic of deaths, too many are because people seek medical attention way too late. Locally most of our initial deaths from the ICU were from people that needed ICU at admittance and didn't seek help until symptoms became dire.
                              Good points. In addition,
                              1. I am thankful that we are accepting the risk to fast-track the vaccine and reduce the liability risk to the drug companies. Not a popular political move to give $ to drug companies. Otherwise we would likely be looking at 18 months minimum.
                              2. 80% effective would be a success for an early vaccine.
                              3. we will likely have to accept temporary side effects. To me that is ok if i don’t get COVID.

                              Comment


                              • Originally posted by Columbuseer View Post

                                Regarding the 1918 vaccine - It was widely regarded to have been ineffective, as it was based on the premise that the flu was a bacteria, not a virus.
                                I think it is not useful to compare COVID-19 to the 1918 spanish flu.
                                1. Just look at the differences in the quality and technology of medical care. Despite all of this technology, 6% of those infected with COVID-19 between 60-69 will die, rising to 12% between 70 and 79.
                                2. It is a very expensive way to die, given today's medical costs. Insurance rates will rise significantly for all of us as a result
                                3. Much more contagious than flu.
                                4. Some folks have lasting side effects (e.g., COVID toes).
                                5. Apparently, the antibodies aren't permanent - you can get it again.


                                Here is the article about 1918 vaccine.

                                https://www.historyofvaccines.org/co...nt-spanish-flu

                                Certainly none of the vaccines described above prevented viral influenza infection – we know now that influenza is caused by a virus, and none of the vaccines protected against it. But were any of them protective against the bacterial infections that developed secondary to influenza? Vaccinologist Stanley A. Plotkin, MD, thinks they were not. He told us, “The bacterial vaccines developed for Spanish influenza were probably ineffective because at the time it was not known that pneumococcal bacteria come in many, many serotypes and that of the bacterial group they called B. influenzae, only one type is a major pathogen.” In other words, the vaccine developers had little ability to identify, isolate, and produce all the potential disease-causing strains of bacteria circulating at the time. Indeed, today’s pneumococcal vaccine for children protects against 13 serotypes of that bacteria, and the vaccine for adults protects against 23 serotyp
                                I’m sure insurance rates will go up as they will use this as an excuse to do so but I’ve read multiple health insurance companies have posted record breaking profits since the pandemic started.

                                Comment

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