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  • JerryWorld

    “In my short time playing in Dallas, I learned a lot about the circus environment that is the world of the Dallas Cowboys. Jerry World as we have come to know it, is the ever present dark cloud that will keep this franchise from reaching the levels of success they attained when they WERE America’s team in the 1990s.” “When I first walked into the Cowboy’s facility as a free agent signing after leaving Jacksonville, I was filled with excitement, yet that would soon turn to annoyance, as I was constantly reminded of the privilege it was to play for the Dallas Cowboys. Posters, and signage plastered all around the facility pushed a message of prestige and inflated arrogance. And as a player who came from a small market team in the Jaguars, I could sense that arrogance a mile away. This was a narrative that was constantly shouted from the mountain tops while at Valley Ranch, not by the players, whom I got along with fine and had immense respect for, but from Jason Garrett and his staff. This was the moniker that no player could escape whether they liked it or not. It was as if we were in some alternate universe in which the Cowboys were defending Super Bowl champs. Except it was a falsehood.” “It was quite mind boggling to me that the staff, headed by Garrett, was promoting a false culture around a mystique that had long since faded in the mind of those who lived outside the cultural bubble of the silver and blue. There is no doubt that the market of the Cowboys brand is the most powerful in sports. That market is based on an image that was built on the back of champions. That image is maintained by a hype machine that works in overdrive 24/7 and usually is more to the detriment of those on the roster than a benefit.” “The Dallas Cowboys fail because they have an owner who has interjected himself in the daily operations of a professional sports franchise. True enough it is his team, but there is a certain level of trust that an owner needs to have in the abilities of his coaching staff to do the job he has paid them to do. Jerry is the final say on all personnel decisions. He is the spokesperson for the cowboys. The biggest fan of the Cowboys. And in the end, his decree is passed down as if he was the head coach of the Cowboys himself. His influence over the entire narrative for the Cowboys is undisputed, both in the media, and the locker room.” “In the end, for better AND for worse, Jerry Jones is responsible for the constant failings of the Dallas Cowboys. The locker room in Dallas buckles under the immense pressure, and hype created by long past success. Long past success and nostalgia that Jerry himself is chasing. Until he decides to let go of that past glory and undisputed control/influence over the narrative of his team, changing coaches will not amount to the success he seeks. Until he steps back and lets go of the power he has embellished himself in, nothing will change. Until he allows himself to see the Dallas Cowboys for what they truly are, they will never be what he so desperately wants them to be. The Dallas Cowboys are a mediocre football franchise. A mediocre franchise with an extraordinary amount of talent. And that is solely the fault of the very man who long ago turned the silver and blue into a way of life. Jerry Jones.”

    Former NFL Player Offensive Lineman
    Uche Nwaneri

    i appreciate people like this because they shed an honest opinion on what is the BIGGEST JOKE IN ALL PROFESSIONAL SPORTS KNOWN AS THE DALLAS COWBOYS. Man, PT Barnum would have been proud of the show Jerry puts on. Claiming greatness and producing lackluster also ran results. Jerry must have been a used car salesman in his former life.

  • #2
    I guess I'm not following. NFL teams are franchises, just like McDonald's. The Dallas Cowboys are a franchise, and Jerry Jones is the franchisee. It's his toy; his investment. It's his to play with how he sees fit. Jerry might enjoy winning, but he obviously enjoys being involved more. That's his right as a franchisee; it's HIS franchise. His business. If you don't like his franchise, then don't support it.

    People forget that the NFL is a business.

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by Techster88 View Post
      “In my short time playing in Dallas, I learned a lot about the circus environment that is the world of the Dallas Cowboys. Jerry World as we have come to know it, is the ever present dark cloud that will keep this franchise from reaching the levels of success they attained when they WERE America’s team in the 1990s.” “When I first walked into the Cowboy’s facility as a free agent signing after leaving Jacksonville, I was filled with excitement, yet that would soon turn to annoyance, as I was constantly reminded of the privilege it was to play for the Dallas Cowboys. Posters, and signage plastered all around the facility pushed a message of prestige and inflated arrogance. And as a player who came from a small market team in the Jaguars, I could sense that arrogance a mile away. This was a narrative that was constantly shouted from the mountain tops while at Valley Ranch, not by the players, whom I got along with fine and had immense respect for, but from Jason Garrett and his staff. This was the moniker that no player could escape whether they liked it or not. It was as if we were in some alternate universe in which the Cowboys were defending Super Bowl champs. Except it was a falsehood.” “It was quite mind boggling to me that the staff, headed by Garrett, was promoting a false culture around a mystique that had long since faded in the mind of those who lived outside the cultural bubble of the silver and blue. There is no doubt that the market of the Cowboys brand is the most powerful in sports. That market is based on an image that was built on the back of champions. That image is maintained by a hype machine that works in overdrive 24/7 and usually is more to the detriment of those on the roster than a benefit.” “The Dallas Cowboys fail because they have an owner who has interjected himself in the daily operations of a professional sports franchise. True enough it is his team, but there is a certain level of trust that an owner needs to have in the abilities of his coaching staff to do the job he has paid them to do. Jerry is the final say on all personnel decisions. He is the spokesperson for the cowboys. The biggest fan of the Cowboys. And in the end, his decree is passed down as if he was the head coach of the Cowboys himself. His influence over the entire narrative for the Cowboys is undisputed, both in the media, and the locker room.” “In the end, for better AND for worse, Jerry Jones is responsible for the constant failings of the Dallas Cowboys. The locker room in Dallas buckles under the immense pressure, and hype created by long past success. Long past success and nostalgia that Jerry himself is chasing. Until he decides to let go of that past glory and undisputed control/influence over the narrative of his team, changing coaches will not amount to the success he seeks. Until he steps back and lets go of the power he has embellished himself in, nothing will change. Until he allows himself to see the Dallas Cowboys for what they truly are, they will never be what he so desperately wants them to be. The Dallas Cowboys are a mediocre football franchise. A mediocre franchise with an extraordinary amount of talent. And that is solely the fault of the very man who long ago turned the silver and blue into a way of life. Jerry Jones.”

      Former NFL Player Offensive Lineman
      Uche Nwaneri

      i appreciate people like this because they shed an honest opinion on what is the BIGGEST JOKE IN ALL PROFESSIONAL SPORTS KNOWN AS THE DALLAS COWBOYS. Man, PT Barnum would have been proud of the show Jerry puts on. Claiming greatness and producing lackluster also ran results. Jerry must have been a used car salesman in his former life.
      Man, you sure do invest a lot of time and energy into the Cowboys...

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by Turbonium View Post

        Man, you sure do invest a lot of time and energy into the Cowboys...
        Not only that, I try to coach them from my recliner in my house. My wife tells me she is pretty sure they can't hear me!

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Techster88 View Post
          “In my short time playing in Dallas, I learned a lot about the circus environment that is the world of the Dallas Cowboys. Jerry World as we have come to know it, is the ever present dark cloud that will keep this franchise from reaching the levels of success they attained when they WERE America’s team in the 1990s.” “When I first walked into the Cowboy’s facility as a free agent signing after leaving Jacksonville, I was filled with excitement, yet that would soon turn to annoyance, as I was constantly reminded of the privilege it was to play for the Dallas Cowboys. Posters, and signage plastered all around the facility pushed a message of prestige and inflated arrogance. And as a player who came from a small market team in the Jaguars, I could sense that arrogance a mile away. This was a narrative that was constantly shouted from the mountain tops while at Valley Ranch, not by the players, whom I got along with fine and had immense respect for, but from Jason Garrett and his staff. This was the moniker that no player could escape whether they liked it or not. It was as if we were in some alternate universe in which the Cowboys were defending Super Bowl champs. Except it was a falsehood.” “It was quite mind boggling to me that the staff, headed by Garrett, was promoting a false culture around a mystique that had long since faded in the mind of those who lived outside the cultural bubble of the silver and blue. There is no doubt that the market of the Cowboys brand is the most powerful in sports. That market is based on an image that was built on the back of champions. That image is maintained by a hype machine that works in overdrive 24/7 and usually is more to the detriment of those on the roster than a benefit.” “The Dallas Cowboys fail because they have an owner who has interjected himself in the daily operations of a professional sports franchise. True enough it is his team, but there is a certain level of trust that an owner needs to have in the abilities of his coaching staff to do the job he has paid them to do. Jerry is the final say on all personnel decisions. He is the spokesperson for the cowboys. The biggest fan of the Cowboys. And in the end, his decree is passed down as if he was the head coach of the Cowboys himself. His influence over the entire narrative for the Cowboys is undisputed, both in the media, and the locker room.” “In the end, for better AND for worse, Jerry Jones is responsible for the constant failings of the Dallas Cowboys. The locker room in Dallas buckles under the immense pressure, and hype created by long past success. Long past success and nostalgia that Jerry himself is chasing. Until he decides to let go of that past glory and undisputed control/influence over the narrative of his team, changing coaches will not amount to the success he seeks. Until he steps back and lets go of the power he has embellished himself in, nothing will change. Until he allows himself to see the Dallas Cowboys for what they truly are, they will never be what he so desperately wants them to be. The Dallas Cowboys are a mediocre football franchise. A mediocre franchise with an extraordinary amount of talent. And that is solely the fault of the very man who long ago turned the silver and blue into a way of life. Jerry Jones.”

          Former NFL Player Offensive Lineman
          Uche Nwaneri

          i appreciate people like this because they shed an honest opinion on what is the BIGGEST JOKE IN ALL PROFESSIONAL SPORTS KNOWN AS THE DALLAS COWBOYS. Man, PT Barnum would have been proud of the show Jerry puts on. Claiming greatness and producing lackluster also ran results. Jerry must have been a used car salesman in his former life.
          *YAWN*

          And there is THIS......

          https://www.forbes.com/sites/kurtbad...ts-teams-2019/

          LMAO!!!

          #GoCowboys

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Turbonium View Post

            Man, you sure do invest a lot of time and energy into the Cowboys...
            RIGHT? hahaha

            His hatred of Jerry sure does own a great deal of real estate in his head.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Herb Street View Post
              I guess I'm not following. NFL teams are franchises, just like McDonald's. The Dallas Cowboys are a franchise, and Jerry Jones is the franchisee. It's his toy; his investment. It's his to play with how he sees fit. Jerry might enjoy winning, but he obviously enjoys being involved more. That's his right as a franchisee; it's HIS franchise. His business. If you don't like his franchise, then don't support it.

              People forget that the NFL is a business.
              Post of the week!

              Could not have said it better!

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Techster88 View Post
                “In my short time playing in Dallas, I learned a lot about the circus environment that is the world of the Dallas Cowboys. Jerry World as we have come to know it, is the ever present dark cloud that will keep this franchise from reaching the levels of success they attained when they WERE America’s team in the 1990s.” “When I first walked into the Cowboy’s facility as a free agent signing after leaving Jacksonville, I was filled with excitement, yet that would soon turn to annoyance, as I was constantly reminded of the privilege it was to play for the Dallas Cowboys. Posters, and signage plastered all around the facility pushed a message of prestige and inflated arrogance. And as a player who came from a small market team in the Jaguars, I could sense that arrogance a mile away. This was a narrative that was constantly shouted from the mountain tops while at Valley Ranch, not by the players, whom I got along with fine and had immense respect for, but from Jason Garrett and his staff. This was the moniker that no player could escape whether they liked it or not. It was as if we were in some alternate universe in which the Cowboys were defending Super Bowl champs. Except it was a falsehood.” “It was quite mind boggling to me that the staff, headed by Garrett, was promoting a false culture around a mystique that had long since faded in the mind of those who lived outside the cultural bubble of the silver and blue. There is no doubt that the market of the Cowboys brand is the most powerful in sports. That market is based on an image that was built on the back of champions. That image is maintained by a hype machine that works in overdrive 24/7 and usually is more to the detriment of those on the roster than a benefit.” “The Dallas Cowboys fail because they have an owner who has interjected himself in the daily operations of a professional sports franchise. True enough it is his team, but there is a certain level of trust that an owner needs to have in the abilities of his coaching staff to do the job he has paid them to do. Jerry is the final say on all personnel decisions. He is the spokesperson for the cowboys. The biggest fan of the Cowboys. And in the end, his decree is passed down as if he was the head coach of the Cowboys himself. His influence over the entire narrative for the Cowboys is undisputed, both in the media, and the locker room.” “In the end, for better AND for worse, Jerry Jones is responsible for the constant failings of the Dallas Cowboys. The locker room in Dallas buckles under the immense pressure, and hype created by long past success. Long past success and nostalgia that Jerry himself is chasing. Until he decides to let go of that past glory and undisputed control/influence over the narrative of his team, changing coaches will not amount to the success he seeks. Until he steps back and lets go of the power he has embellished himself in, nothing will change. Until he allows himself to see the Dallas Cowboys for what they truly are, they will never be what he so desperately wants them to be. The Dallas Cowboys are a mediocre football franchise. A mediocre franchise with an extraordinary amount of talent. And that is solely the fault of the very man who long ago turned the silver and blue into a way of life. Jerry Jones.”

                Former NFL Player Offensive Lineman
                Uche Nwaneri

                i appreciate people like this because they shed an honest opinion on what is the BIGGEST JOKE IN ALL PROFESSIONAL SPORTS KNOWN AS THE DALLAS COWBOYS. Man, PT Barnum would have been proud of the show Jerry puts on. Claiming greatness and producing lackluster also ran results. Jerry must have been a used car salesman in his former life.
                Jerruh does a fine job. He needs to keep doing what he’s been doing since 1996!

                Comment


                • #9
                  Wrong thread

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Nice to see Jimmy Johnson get the HOF announcement today. And Aikmans response was GOLD.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      The CHEFS (misspelled intentionally) give us Cowboys fans HOPE. It’s only been 50 years since their last Super Bowl appearance and win.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Techster88 View Post
                        The CHEFS (misspelled intentionally) give us Cowboys fans HOPE. It’s only been 50 years since their last Super Bowl appearance and win.
                        And the Forty Whiners who were 4-12 a year ago..... Oh wait. They actually have a management team that got it through their arrogant, thick heads and let the coach do his thing. Imagine that.

                        Comment


                        • #13

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