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  • COVID & Wheeling?

    Urbana closing got me wondering about the situation at Wheeling and if they will survive the Corona forced closure. The simple answer is that they are BOUND to close. But I wonder. The major issues that are effecting a college's ability to weather this closure is service of their debt, and the cost of maintaining their physical plant. Wheeling is in a rather unique position compared to other colleges. First, they don't own any of their facilities, second, the terms of their rent are very favorable, third, they have already cut staff (to include maintenance staff) to the bone, forth, they probably don't have a huge debt.

  • #2
    How can schools like that afford ANY athletics? Or do athletes make up such a large % of the student body that they have to have them?

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    • #3
      Originally posted by laker View Post
      How can schools like that afford ANY athletics? Or do athletes make up such a large % of the student body that they have to have them?
      Urbana had a massive percentage of its student body who were athletes. A lot of schools would never get students to attend if they didn't have athletics -- especially ones in the middle of nowhere with nothing else to really offer.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by laker View Post
        Or do athletes make up such a large % of the student body that they have to have them?
        Ding ding ding! We have a winner. There is an absurd percentage of the Wheeling student body who consider themselves athletes.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Scrub View Post

          Ding ding ding! We have a winner. There is an absurd percentage of the Wheeling student body who consider themselves athletes.
          I don't think it will ever happen but it strikes me that WVU-WHEELING would be a very useful feeder school and could easily generate a profit in several years if not immediately.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by IUPbigINDIANS View Post

            Urbana had a massive percentage of its student body who were athletes. A lot of schools would never get students to attend if they didn't have athletics -- especially ones in the middle of nowhere with nothing else to really offer.
            You mean like Indiana PA??

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            • #7
              Originally posted by laker View Post
              How can schools like that afford ANY athletics? Or do athletes make up such a large % of the student body that they have to have them?
              Simple math. Say a DII school provides 32 scholarship equivilents to it's 100 player football team. If the tuition at the school is $10,000, that is a cost of $320,000. The other 68 players pay the same $10,000 for a total to the school of $680,000. Net profit to the school is $360,000.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by boatcapt View Post
                You mean like Indiana PA??
                Indiana might as well be NYC compared to WL

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by boatcapt View Post

                  Simple math. Say a DII school provides 32 scholarship equivilents to it's 100 player football team. If the tuition at the school is $10,000, that is a cost of $320,000. The other 68 players pay the same $10,000 for a total to the school of $680,000. Net profit to the school is $360,000.
                  Revenue. Not profit.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by IUPbigINDIANS View Post

                    Indiana might as well be NYC compared to WL
                    Who would want to go to NYC???

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Scrub View Post

                      Ding ding ding! We have a winner. There is an absurd percentage of the Wheeling student body who consider themselves athletes.
                      This. The Dept of Education doesn’t have updated numbers for this academic year yet. But, back before the name change and reduction in academic offerings, WJU was already down to 755 full time undergrads. 442 of them were student athletes. The numbers are probably even more slanted now, as the school chopped numerous majors.

                      Urbana was also way more than 50% student athletes. In the G-MAC, we have OVU with similarly insane % and a few others hovering close to 50%.

                      There are a lot of schools (nationwide) whose doors are only open because many kids have an extreme desire to play college sports.
                      Last edited by BlueBlood; 04-28-2020, 07:16 AM.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by BlueBlood View Post

                        This. The Dept of Education doesn’t have updated numbers for this academic year yet. But, back before the name change and reduction in academic offerings, WJU was already down to 755 full time undergrads. 442 of them were student athletes. The numbers are probably even more slanted now, as the school chopped numerous majors.

                        Urbana was also way more than 50% student athletes. In the G-MAC, we have OVU with similarly insane % and a few others hovering close to 50%.

                        There are a lot of schools (nationwide) whose doors are only open because many kids have an extreme desire to play college sports.
                        Not sure how predictive the student athlete to student ratio is as far as a school surviving but PSAC/PASSHE schools range from high of 20% 318/1599 at MANSFIELD to a low of 3.7% 635/17527 at WEST CHESTER. For whatever that's worth.

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                        • #13
                          Percentage of students that participate in athletics is a meaninngless number just as the % of students who are in the marching band or that have red hair is meaningless. People point to schools with a high number with a mixture of shock and outrage as if it is somehow indicative of somthing. Really it is just another thing schools do to increase enrollment like offering free wifi or remodeling dorms.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by boatcapt View Post
                            Percentage of students that participate in athletics is a meaninngless number just as the % of students who are in the marching band or that have red hair is meaningless. People point to schools with a high number with a mixture of shock and outrage as if it is somehow indicative of somthing. Really it is just another thing schools do to increase enrollment like offering free wifi or remodeling dorms.
                            Fair enough. But I would argue that using athletics (i.e., selling kids on some kind of dream) as a recruitment measure for, like, 75% of your student body starts to border on unethical. Recall, that WJU has traditionally had, like, 30 kids "on" the basketball roster. They can only dress about 14 of those. And they can only give schollys to a fraction. It seems disingenuous to sell 30 kids on a dream of college basketball just to "dupe" them into paying a bunch of tuition. I would think the schools with the REALLY high % of athletes is indicative of trouble (and Urbana and Wheeling are two examples of that). So, I disagree that it's not indicative of anything. But I get what you're saying about colleges using all kinds of tactics to lure kids in. A fair point. It just feels like selling kids a new dorm, or good learning support, or quality academic programs (other things schools use to lure students in) is a better play than selling them on some athletic dream they likely will never realize. I remember seeing in the local papers when a few local kids (who were not D2 college prospects by any stretch) were "committing" to Wheeling to play basketball. Yes, those kids did show up Freshman year and get their photo taken with the team. But they were on those rosters for 1 year at best, and all they were really "committing" to was paying $22,000 for that year and that team photo. That doesn't feel right. But I get that they're big boys and girls who can make that decision if they choose.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by boatcapt View Post
                              Percentage of students that participate in athletics is a meaninngless number just as the % of students who are in the marching band or that have red hair is meaningless. People point to schools with a high number with a mixture of shock and outrage as if it is somehow indicative of somthing. Really it is just another thing schools do to increase enrollment like offering free wifi or remodeling dorms.
                              I don’t think a school shrinking in enrollment to the point where the majority of remaining students are student-athletes is meaningless.
                              If a school’s enrollment has dropped to that level, it is likely indicative of underlying non-sports-related issues at the institution.

                              BTW - the Urbana president said he needed at least 500 students to keep the campus viable. He only had 350.

                              Last edited by BlueBlood; 04-29-2020, 11:14 AM.

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