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Will we have football in the fall?

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  • #61
    Originally posted by Sec10-A-14 View Post

    Heard a news blip one biomed company is working on a test strip that is placed on your tongue and in seconds lets you know results.
    I'd buy that stock
    If I were a betting man I'd short sell it.

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    • #62
      Schedule reductions have been approved. Max of 10 games, minimum of 7 to make the post season.

      https://www.themiaa.com/news/2020/5/...2020-2021.aspx

      https://ncaaorg.s3.amazonaws.com/cha...quirements.pdf

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      • #63
        Originally posted by ccmoney8 View Post

        These decisions seem to be split along both political lines, and also along the lines of football sponsorship. CSU system shuts down campuses, yet San Diego State plans to proceed with fall sports. CCAA becomes the first to cancel fall sports, yet doesn't sponsor football. SEC/Big 12 are full steam ahead for football, yet UConn has said it's unlikely. Strange tensions at work here.
        UConn is likely to drop football in my opinion. When conference realignment killed Big East football only a few years after UConn reinstated football, the response from some gave me the impression that the program would be discontinued at some point. The move to the AAC did nothing for their historically powerful men's and women's basketball programs. So their move back to the Big East (now a non-football conference) leaves football as an independent. I think UConn's "unlikely" position on playing football is foreshadowing football not returning to the university.

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        • #64
          Short answer: yes there will be football in the fall.

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          • #65
            Originally posted by Sec10-A-14 View Post

            Heard a news blip one biomed company is working on a test strip that is placed on your tongue and in seconds lets you know results.
            I'd buy that stock
            Experts say the quicker and cheaper the test the higher the percentage of false positives and negatives. The false positives can be dealt with by a better more sensitive test. The false negatives are sleeper super spreaders that go on to infect entire team.

            I can certainly see lots of teams going with cheap and quick tests and giving themselves an early false sense of security until older coaches start getting sick and a better test finds large percentage of team infected. I hope it works, but I have serious doubts that a full schedule will be played for most teams that attempt the season.

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            • #66
              Originally posted by Wildcat Khan View Post

              Also looking at the stats for Kittitas County and what Inslee is saying, it could be one of the first to open in the state with both a low infection rate among the population and a low population total and could be good news for CWU. Neighboring Yakima County though is being hit a lot harder.
              I agree. Yakima county has been hit hard but all other counties in Central/Eastern Washington are very minimal. For a revamped schedule if CWU is not able to travel to Michigan (2), California and Texas this year, I could see CWU trying to schedule games with NAIA/FCS schools to the East (Idaho, Montana). Not so sure they would schedule D3 unless the really needed to fill 4-5 open slots.

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              • #67
                https://www.espn.com/college-footbal...-1-sources-say

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                • #68
                  Athletic department official from Missouri just told Paul Feinbaum that COVID tests cost $65.00 each and they won’t be testing everyone, just those who show symptoms or have reason to test. This is costs vs. football equation that is going to lead to asymtomatic outbreaks. Teams won’t make it through preseason practice if this is how they plan to handle testing.

                  I doubt many will spend $6,500.00 plus prior to each practice and before and after each game. I have also heard one coach say they might be testing 2-3 times per week, which is still a large chunk of change, especially for D2/3 and NAIA. Teams will try to economize testing costs and some will get burned with this plan.
                  Last edited by Argonut; 05-22-2020, 11:11 AM.

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                  • #69
                    Maybe there might be football this fall. Per NCAA


                    https://www.npr.org/sections/coronav...rusliveupdates
                    'Go to Heaven for the climate, Hell for the company.'

                    Comment


                    • #70
                      Originally posted by Wildcat94 View Post

                      I agree. Yakima county has been hit hard but all other counties in Central/Eastern Washington are very minimal. For a revamped schedule if CWU is not able to travel to Michigan (2), California and Texas this year, I could see CWU trying to schedule games with NAIA/FCS schools to the East (Idaho, Montana). Not so sure they would schedule D3 unless the really needed to fill 4-5 open slots.
                      UofO and OSU also in counties not hit hard in Oregon and Portland has been hit about as hard as the Tri-Cities for PSU. I was surprised to look up Lane County which is a similar metro size to the Tri-Cities and saw they had less than 5 deaths and below a 0.02% infection rate of the population so things are looking good for the Ducks. I could easily see CWU or the the Oregon schools picking up a game with EWU or PSU (add on EOU and SOU for CWU) if needed should the numbers stay similar for the areas.

                      The news about the SEC will also be interesting and how things go with them opening next month.

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                      • #71
                        What will things look like when players return?

                        While officials continue to figure out when and how college football players will be able to safely return to campus, everyone is going to have to get accustomed to a new normal. From weight rooms to practice fields to dining halls, things will be different. And, upon arrival, coronavirus testing will be key.
                        'Go to Heaven for the climate, Hell for the company.'

                        Comment


                        • #72
                          Originally posted by wssuram View Post

                          UConn is likely to drop football in my opinion. When conference realignment killed Big East football only a few years after UConn reinstated football, the response from some gave me the impression that the program would be discontinued at some point. The move to the AAC did nothing for their historically powerful men's and women's basketball programs. So their move back to the Big East (now a non-football conference) leaves football as an independent. I think UConn's "unlikely" position on playing football is foreshadowing football not returning to the university.
                          UConn is a partner in the stadium they had built for them nearly 20 years ago. They are required to pay the first $250000 of the stadium’s operating losses. The state pays the rest of the losses. The stadium is heavily reliant on football because they don’t want the UConn money to go towards losses on other events, so few other events are held there. The stadium isn’t bad, but it’s operated terribly and it’s not great to get in or out of there. It’s the result of the state’s desperate attempt to build a football stadium that was, in theory, a part of a plan to lure the Patriots to CT back in the 90’s.

                          UConn should at the least go back down to FCS (their former league mate UMass should do the same), but there’s too much money involved (the stadium cost $92 million to build) and too much politics involved.

                          https://www.courant.com/business/hc-...4y4-story.html

                          (I’m originally from CT - The state has serious financial issues and their state universities and colleges have their own issues too)

                          Comment


                          • #73
                            Originally posted by cwfenn View Post

                            UConn is a partner in the stadium they had built for them nearly 20 years ago. They are required to pay the first $250000 of the stadium’s operating losses. The state pays the rest of the losses. The stadium is heavily reliant on football because they don’t want the UConn money to go towards losses on other events, so few other events are held there. The stadium isn’t bad, but it’s operated terribly and it’s not great to get in or out of there. It’s the result of the state’s desperate attempt to build a football stadium that was, in theory, a part of a plan to lure the Patriots to CT back in the 90’s.

                            UConn should at the least go back down to FCS (their former league mate UMass should do the same), but there’s too much money involved (the stadium cost $92 million to build) and too much politics involved.

                            https://www.courant.com/business/hc-...4y4-story.html

                            (I’m originally from CT - The state has serious financial issues and their state universities and colleges have their own issues too)
                            I could see a lot of universities from the Mid majors taking a hard look at their programs when its all said and done here and we could see some division shifts. I would have to think that some MAC and other programs would be really thinking hard about dropping down to D1-AA football. And that could set up another round of musical chairs.

                            Comment


                            • #74
                              Originally posted by bigmrg74 View Post
                              I could see a lot of universities from the Mid majors taking a hard look at their programs when its all said and done here and we could see some division shifts. I would have to think that some MAC and other programs would be really thinking hard about dropping down to D1-AA football. And that could set up another round of musical chairs.
                              I would agree, except the MAC gets it's $ from mid-week TV, not fans buying tixs.

                              Comment


                              • #75
                                Anyone see the comments made by the U of Michigan President. Now of course, he may be biased because he's an immunologist...He says no college football at Michigan if students aren't in the classroom. But what does an immunologist know?!

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