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  • https://lancasteronline.com/news/loc...cec4a2704.html

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    • Chris Lapos, associate vice president of admissions at Bloomsburg University, expects the incoming freshman class to be smaller than normal. Another extension of the commitment deadline isn’t out of the question as delays, he said, and delays in commitments are expected.

      The economic and cultural uncertainties caused by the global pandemic and resulting mitigation efforts — stay-at-home orders, 6-foot social distancing — will change what some teens intended post-high school, Lapos said. He expects some to pass on the four-year, residential experience. Maybe they attend part-time. Maybe they look at community colleges, perhaps more affordable and closer to home.

      “We know that’s out there. Survey data has told us that already,” Lapos said.
      Carnegie Dartlet, a higher education research and marketing firm, surveyed 4,848 high school seniors, with 2/3 of respondents saying a May 1 commitment deadline wasn’t realistic. Nearly half of the respondents said they would choose a school without an actual visit. Just 23 percent said they were highly confident to pay for college and 17 percent said they had no confidence.

      https://www.dailyitem.com/news/coron...9b7add2fe.html

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      • Originally posted by iupgroundhog View Post

        Not sure I understand the question.


        https://www.indianagazette.com/news/...14c550ff6.html
        I apologize. I thought the wording of the question was rather straightforward. Although I'm not a reader of the Indiana Gazette (sorry Matt), the linked article doesn't provide details beyond the dollar figure that Pidgeon stated - $100,000,000 and the potential source - "room and board". While the students' received a prorated refund on their room and board, each school's costs were also reduced as there is also no corresponding food, water, sewer, electricity or food service and custodial staff for the remainder of the spring semester. So what are the increased losses? And since it was up to the individual schools to decide if and how to give refunds, are the losses being incurred by the state system, the individual universities, or the university-related but not university owned entities that own the residence halls?

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        • Originally posted by Horror Child View Post

          I apologize. I thought the wording of the question was rather straightforward. Although I'm not a reader of the Indiana Gazette (sorry Matt), the linked article doesn't provide details beyond the dollar figure that Pidgeon stated - $100,000,000 and the potential source - "room and board". While the students' received a prorated refund on their room and board, each school's costs were also reduced as there is also no corresponding food, water, sewer, electricity or food service and custodial staff for the remainder of the spring semester. So what are the increased losses? And since it was up to the individual schools to decide if and how to give refunds, are the losses being incurred by the state system, the individual universities, or the university-related but not university owned entities that own the residence halls?
          So, how much of that estimated $100 million shortfall is left after you consider the reduction in costs? Good question. I'm not sure who would know that, though.

          It's true. Pidgeon's statement only addresses lost revenue not the corresponding cost savings. I think the savings would be a small fraction of the lost revenue based on what we know about utility costs in comparison to rent.

          Nor do I know how the financial arrangement between PASSHE, the universities, and the "university-related" residence halls works. If anybody has insight on that I'd love to hear it. I do think that when all is said and done the $100 million shortfall he estimates takes these things into consideration.

          (BTW, sometimes you have to spell things out for me or I won't get it.)

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          • Originally posted by iupgroundhog View Post


            So, how much of that estimated $100 million shortfall is left after you consider the reduction in costs? Good question. I'm not sure who would know that, though.

            It's true. Pidgeon's statement only addresses lost revenue not the corresponding cost savings. I think the savings would be a small fraction of the lost revenue based on what we know about utility costs in comparison to rent.

            Nor do I know how the financial arrangement between PASSHE, the universities, and the "university-related" residence halls works. If anybody has insight on that I'd love to hear it. I do think that when all is said and done the $100 million shortfall he estimates takes these things into consideration.

            (BTW, sometimes you have to spell things out for me or I won't get it.)
            Half of the federal money was to help cover the returned fee money. The exact amount for each school is public. A quick glance shows PASSHE schools average about $2.5 million to cover refunded fees and $2 million for emergency student aid. Edinboro is giving each student $450 with that money.

            Some staff are furloughed. I read its roughly 700 systemwide. I imagine these are housekeeping, general maintenance, food service, etc. Most employees are union and can't be furloughed in this situation.

            The housing arrangements are tough because the financing is always tied to an occupancy rate. There may be some arrangements with the lender given the circumstances. If residency goes down next year that affects it too.

            I still think the circumstances could benefit PASSHE. During recessions college enrollment increases. There are fewer for-profit colleges out there and if people second guess their spending, we're cheaper than Penn State BFE Campus and St. Overpriced Private College.

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            • Originally posted by iupgroundhog View Post


              So, how much of that estimated $100 million shortfall is left after you consider the reduction in costs? Good question. I'm not sure who would know that, though.

              It's true. Pidgeon's statement only addresses lost revenue not the corresponding cost savings. I think the savings would be a small fraction of the lost revenue based on what we know about utility costs in comparison to rent.

              Nor do I know how the financial arrangement between PASSHE, the universities, and the "university-related" residence halls works. If anybody has insight on that I'd love to hear it. I do think that when all is said and done the $100 million shortfall he estimates takes these things into consideration.

              (BTW, sometimes you have to spell things out for me or I won't get it.)
              Half of the federal money was to help cover the returned fee money. The exact amount for each school is public. A quick glance shows PASSHE schools average about $2.5 million to cover refunded fees and $2 million for emergency student aid. Edinboro is giving each student $450 with that money.

              Some staff are furloughed. I read its roughly 700 systemwide. I imagine these are housekeeping, general maintenance, food service, etc. Most employees are union and can't be furloughed in this situation.

              The housing arrangements are tough because the financing is always tied to an occupancy rate. There may be some arrangements with the lender given the circumstances. If residency goes down next year that affects it too.

              I still think the circumstances could benefit PASSHE. During recessions college enrollment increases. There are fewer for-profit colleges out there and if people second guess their spending, we're cheaper than Penn State BFE Campus and St. Overpriced Private College.

              Comment


              • More perspective from Susan Snyder, Pulitzer winning education writer (and IUP alum) from The Philadelphia Inquirer.

                https://www.inquirer.com/education/c...-20200420.html

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                • Originally posted by iupgroundhog View Post
                  More perspective from Susan Snyder, Pulitzer winning education writer (and IUP alum) from The Philadelphia Inquirer.

                  https://www.inquirer.com/education/c...-20200420.html
                  It's confusing how they are giving that money out. The PSAC list goes WCU, IUP, Bloom, KU, and then Slippery Rock. Rock is the third largest school, but is behind KU and Bloom. It should make IUPNation happy that IUP gets more than UPenn; probably because they are the Harvard of the PSAC.

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                  • Originally posted by Bart View Post

                    It's confusing how they are giving that money out. The PSAC list goes WCU, IUP, Bloom, KU, and then Slippery Rock. Rock is the third largest school, but is behind KU and Bloom. It should make IUPNation happy that IUP gets more than UPenn; probably because they are the Harvard of the PSAC.
                    There was a formula and it weighted students who are Pell. Tells you that Slippery Rock must not have a lot of Pell kids.

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                    • Colleges being sued for reimbursement of tuition. Is this coming our way?

                      https://www.pressenterpriseonline.co...s-seek-refunds

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                      • Originally posted by Bart View Post

                        It's confusing how they are giving that money out. The PSAC list goes WCU, IUP, Bloom, KU, and then Slippery Rock. Rock is the third largest school, but is behind KU and Bloom. It should make IUPNation happy that IUP gets more than UPenn; probably because they are the Harvard of the PSAC.
                        1. IUP should have received more than Penn State. Why is Penn State getting a penny? They have billions in endowment.

                        2. Princeton is the top ranked Ivy, which means IUP is the Princeton of the Pee Sack.

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                        • Originally posted by Fightingscot82 View Post

                          There was a formula and it weighted students who are Pell. Tells you that Slippery Rock must not have a lot of Pell kids.
                          Uh...gym teachers!!

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                          • Originally posted by IUPNation View Post

                            1. IUP should have received more than Penn State. Why is Penn State getting a penny? They have billions in endowment.

                            2. Princeton is the top ranked Ivy, which means IUP is the Princeton of the Pee Sack.
                            All those Penn State Eastkabum campuses are loaded with Pell kids. That's part of the reason they were created. Like the myth of the outlet mall deal, all it did was send factory seconds away from the headquarters.

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                            • Originally posted by Fightingscot82 View Post

                              All those Penn State Eastkabum campuses are loaded with Pell kids. That's part of the reason they were created. Like the myth of the outlet mall deal, all it did was send factory seconds away from the headquarters.

                              There's always that appeal though ... "I went to Penn State" or "I went to Pitt" ... most leave off the 'New Kensington' or 'Bradford' part of that sentence.

                              Comment


                              • Originally posted by IUPbigINDIANS View Post


                                There's always that appeal though ... "I went to Penn State" or "I went to Pitt" ... most leave off the 'New Kensington' or 'Bradford' part of that sentence.
                                That's a more recent thing and State College is to blame. Back in 06 I was working at Behrend. Behrend is probably the most independent of the branches. It has several grad programs, some wealthy donors, and the lowest amount of students transferring to main campus. When I was there, the mothership had just installed a lion shrine on campus and gave them a mascot suit just like the one at Beaver Stadium. The bookstore also phased out Behrend specific merchandise in favor of generic Penn State stuff. They've since done this at all campuses. Pitt has also done this to a degree at their branches.

                                One aspect of the branches that should help the western PASSHE schools in the long run is that many State related branches are in declining towns. Monaca, Johnstown, Titusville, McKeesport, DuBois, Altoona, New Kensington, Sharon, Uniontown, etc.
                                Last edited by Fightingscot82; 05-07-2020, 10:27 AM.

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