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  • Originally posted by Ship69 View Post

    I think a lot of factors are at work here other than the commuter thing. One particular area that has hurt is the lack of a nursing program at Ship, which steps are being taken to address. We are now up to five engineering majors and are starting to see a return on that, actually some of them from the western part of the state. A new engineering lab is schedule for completion by next September. I'm not sure why the 45 minutes from the western shore seems like two-and-a-half hours to you. It doesn't seem that way at all to me. Hell, I can be to Philadelphia or most of the way to Pittsburgh in two-and-a-half hours. And in fact some of our biggest county growth in recent years has come from Philadelphia and Montgomery counties, which are more convenient to West Chester and Millersville than to Ship. In Lancaster County, PSU is probably hurting Millersville more than Ship. With our addition of several engineering programs, I see little other than the aforementioned nursing that the PSU campus offers that is not offered at Ship, employment-related or otherwise.

    Certainly, the Penn State campuses are a problem for many of the state schools. The biggest problem in Pa. increasingly is too much college capacity for a declining number of college students. By allowing a state-related system to basically expand into the areas of the state-owned system while performing many of the same functions, our legislators have certainly contributed to this. And, of course, Penn State has a bigger name and reputation than the state schools, probably deserved in some areas and not so much in others. Guess we'll see how it all shakes out.


    Penn State is probably one of the biggest factors here. Lots of kids will go to a place like PSU Mont Alto or PSU Berks. But when they graduate they will say they graduated from PSU.

    Not exactly a lie, but a PSU education opens more doors.

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    • https://www.inquirer.com/education/p...-20200214.html

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      • So many maddening items in that article

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        • Originally posted by Horror Child View Post

          So many maddening items in that article
          After spending a year and a bunch of money “building consensus “ you just do what the accountants say anyway

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          • Will the closing of campuses this semester have a financial impact on some schools surviving? Students are going to be reimbursed for room and board to some extent, if the schools remain closed. Staff are still going to be paid. Some campuses may have to dig deep into any reserves to stay out of debt. Sports are one thing, but this virus could impact the survival of some alma maters.

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            • Originally posted by Bart View Post
              Will the closing of campuses this semester have a financial impact on some schools surviving? Students are going to be reimbursed for room and board to some extent, if the schools remain closed. Staff are still going to be paid. Some campuses may have to dig deep into any reserves to stay out of debt. Sports are one thing, but this virus could impact the survival of some alma maters.
              I'm not so certain that the schools will reimburse for unused meal plan and the remaining 2 months of housing.

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              • Originally posted by shipfbfan1 View Post

                I'm not so certain that the schools will reimburse for unused meal plan and the remaining 2 months of housing.
                Some colleges have already made the decision to reimburse, like University of Rhode Island, Duke, Amherst, Smith, Maine, and Brown. Students are demanding money back, so it will a sticky situation.

                “You can’t charge for goods and services that you don’t provide,” said Mark Kantrowitz, a higher education expert. (Since most classes are being moved online, tuition refunds will be less of an issue.)

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                • Originally posted by shipfbfan1 View Post

                  I'm not so certain that the schools will reimburse for unused meal plan and the remaining 2 months of housing.
                  From WCU's FAQ's
                  The University is working through a process to refund a prorated portion of non-instructional fees such as campus housing, dining, etc.
                  From Ship's FAQ'
                  Students who remain off campus will receive housing and dining prorated refunds based on the length of time they are not living on campus or not accessing campus food services. Details on refunds will be shared at a later date.
                  From Kutztown's FAQ's
                  At this time, the university has not made determinations on refunds. When information is available, it will be shared.
                  From Mansfield's FAQ's
                  Residential students who make the decision to move out of the residence halls by Wednesday, March 18 will receive reimbursement for housing and meal plans on a pro rata basis. At this time, Mansfield University is focused acutely on the implementation of safety measures for our campus community and resuming courses online on March 23. We thank you for your patience as we focus on these critical needs. Once students have completed the move-out process and once we can resume normal operations, Mansfield will provide additional communication about the reimbursement process.
                  From LHU's FAQ's
                  Students will be credited on a pro-rated basis for dining and housing for the time that face-to-face courses are suspended. More details surrounding dining and housing credits will be shared at a later time.
                  To Bart's question, professors will likely be lenient on students due to the unusual circumstances. But then, students might find that the schedule flexibility and reduced non-instructional fees make online learning more appealing, which may adversely impact all traditional institutions of higher learning.

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                  • Originally posted by Horror Child View Post

                    To Bart's question, professors will likely be lenient on students due to the unusual circumstances. But then, students might find that the schedule flexibility and reduced non-instructional fees make online learning more appealing, which may adversely impact all traditional institutions of higher learning.
                    Everybody might come to the realization that classrooms are superfluous.

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                    • Bloom's courses are on-line for the rest of the semester. Governor shut down non-essential businesses. It has to hurt the recruitment of students to colleges, with the cancellation of open houses and visits. Next year's student population for SSHE could take a nose dive.

                      After watching the latest virus update, they are predicting it could go to August or longer. I see a 50/50 chance there will be no fall football.

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                      • Originally posted by Bart View Post
                        Bloom's courses are on-line for the rest of the semester. Governor shut down non-essential businesses. It has to hurt the recruitment of students to colleges, with the cancellation of open houses and visits. Next year's student population for SSHE could take a nose dive.

                        After watching the latest virus update, they are predicting it could go to August or longer. I see a 50/50 chance there will be no fall football.
                        Thanks for the update, Bart.

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                        • Meanwhile, state Auditor General Eugene DePasquale said his office is looking into whether it is feasible for the State System to refund students for a portion of their room and board costs

                          “With schools switching to online instruction, many students are asking whether they’ll be refunded for housing and meals that they will not receive,” DePasquale said. “This is not an unreasonable question and I applaud the universities for acting promptly to prevent or slow the spread of COVID-19.”

                          System spokesman David Pidgeon said the system and its universities “acknowledge there is a significant financial component that student and families are thinking about right now as they go through this event. We’re cognizant of that. We will address those issues.”
                          ....

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                          • Originally posted by Bart View Post
                            ....
                            All bets are off. We're going to see similar disarray in all aspects of society. You can turn on your TV and see all these experts and leaders and nobody knows where we're going. Eventually, somebody is going to have to lead us through this. That's not happening now. We might need some kind of new structure like an ad-hoc leadership group to be formed or something. People who are smart and trusted.

                            We all need to stay sane because this might get pretty crazy (it already is).

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                            • Originally posted by Bart View Post
                              ....
                              Is this a state system or university decision? When students live in on-campus housing, are checks made out to the university or the state system? And some housing, although it appears to be on campus, is not university or system system owned, so the decision would lie with that independent entity.

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                              • I think we'll see credits rather than refunds. Very few students live on campus beyond the required period. The most vulnerable students (financially) are those who work retail and service jobs to make college payments but can't work now.

                                I also wonder if PASSHE could benefit from the drop in campus visits. They can't visit Kent State or Towson so maybe they'll choose proximity and familiarity by choosing a PASSHE school. This is causing a big disruption in the admissions world like nothing since probably WW2. Lots of admissions events canceled - both to recruit for fall 20 but also fall 21. I just read something this morning that top tier campuses are refusing to adjust deadlines. That puts pressure on families to act normally in abnormal times.

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