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  • FYI Newcomer profile - Aiden Satterfield


    High School: 2-time first-team All-Stater averaged 21.4 points and 8.3 rebounds as a senior for Charleston Catholic’s West Virginia “Final Four” squad. …1,000-point scorer holds CCHS single-game records for points (46) and 3-point field goals (10). …Team MVP and Slam Dunk champion at West Virginia North-South All-Star Game. He is majoring in Computer Information Systems

    IMHO Notes:
    - Unusually complete player who can score inside and out, dribble, pass, and rebound.
    - High motor who runs court really well
    - Makes good decisions in real time in transition
    - Unselfish
    - Some d1 schools wanted him to bulk up and change his body in the their strength program in order for him to fit their style, but he did not prefer this scenario, given his current skill set.
    - He continued to hear from WVU and Lincoln Memorial even after committing to WLU.
    - With WLU style, he does not have to remake his body in order to play, as bulk is not a prerequisite to playing time.
    - Just needs time to adjust to speed and talent of the college game

    IMHO Long-term Assessment:
    - Combination of skill and length could make him a matchup nightmare
    - Ceiling extremely high

    Comment


    • With skills like his, anything less than All-American (not Freshman All-American) needs to happen his Freshman season. Anything less than 20 PPG (.450 from 3), 7 RPG, 4 APG and 2 steals PG will be a disappointing.

      Comment


      • Originally posted by boatcapt View Post
        With skills like his, anything less than All-American (not Freshman All-American) needs to happen his Freshman season. Anything less than 20 PPG (.450 from 3), 7 RPG, 4 APG and 2 steals PG will be a disappointing.
        He is too cerebral, mature and unselfish to worry about stats. He just wants to win.
        IMHO, this is a very deep, experienced team. It is 15 deep, a problem most coaches would love to have.

        Do u redshirt folks because there are not enough minutes to go around , even though redshirts are talented players? Or go with 3 platoons? Have to wait and see.

        Comment


        • Originally posted by Columbuseer View Post

          He is too cerebral, mature and unselfish to worry about stats. He just wants to win.
          IMHO, this is a very deep, experienced team. It is 15 deep, a problem most coaches would love to have.

          Do u redshirt folks because there are not enough minutes to go around , even though redshirts are talented players? Or go with 3 platoons? Have to wait and see.
          Hopefully he is cerebral enough to understand that the team has a better chance of winning if he scores 20+ most nights. With his already well honed D1 skill set and high basketball IQ, he seems to be the clear plug and play replacement for perenial All-American Dalton Bolon.

          Comment


          • Originally posted by boatcapt View Post

            Hopefully he is cerebral enough to understand that the team has a better chance of winning if he scores 20+ most nights. With his already well honed D1 skill set and high basketball IQ, he seems to be the clear plug and play replacement for perenial All-American Dalton Bolon.
            the wlu style does not depend on one person getting 20 a night. Definitely not a shortage of scorers. Lol.

            Aiden definitely has a long-term high ceiling. But there is an obvious adjustment from high school to college and to the wlu style. Wlu has talented, experienced players already on the wlu roster.

            A plug and play replacement for Dalton is a tall order indeed. The open question for me is who on the roster can get offensive rebounds like Dalton? It requires great desire and effort as well as early anticipation of the shot. Nearly all of the offensive rebounders ahead of him in the national rebounding rankings were significantly taller than he.

            To go way out on a limb, my sgt schultz guess is that Viktor could start in place of Dalton, as he is taller and a better three point shooter. Watched him get 34 against eventual elite 8 truman state. But he faces the same adjustment period as the other newcomers.


            Comment


            • Originally posted by Columbuseer View Post

              the wlu style does not depend on one person getting 20 a night. Definitely not a shortage of scorers. Lol.

              Aiden definitely has a long-term high ceiling. But there is an obvious adjustment from high school to college and to the wlu style. Wlu has talented, experienced players already on the wlu roster.

              A plug and play replacement for Dalton is a tall order indeed. The open question for me is who on the roster can get offensive rebounds like Dalton? It requires great desire and effort as well as early anticipation of the shot. Nearly all of the offensive rebounders ahead of him in the national rebounding rankings were significantly taller than he.

              To go way out on a limb, my sgt schultz guess is that Viktor could start in place of Dalton, as he is taller and a better three point shooter. Watched him get 34 against eventual elite 8 truman state. But he faces the same adjustment period as the other newcomers.

              I count three games last year were at least one WLU player did not eclipse 20 points. Typically Bolon was at the stop of the scoring heap.

              Read an interview with/about Aiden. Paraphrasing here but he said he had D1 offers but that they wanted him to hit the weights and become bigger to earn playing time. He said that he was not interested which kind of indicates to me that he believes he is a "turn-key" product as is.

              Comment


              • Originally posted by boatcapt View Post

                I count three games last year were at least one WLU player did not eclipse 20 points. Typically Bolon was at the stop of the scoring heap.

                Read an interview with/about Aiden. Paraphrasing here but he said he had D1 offers but that they wanted him to hit the weights and become bigger to earn playing time. He said that he was not interested which kind of indicates to me that he believes he is a "turn-key" product as is.
                That was a good interview.
                Aiden is ultra-talented. We just need to give him time to adjust.

                I thought your previous assertion was that one person, specifically Aiden, had to score 20 points most nights even as a freshman. Even Dalton did not score 20 points in 11 games last season. Statistical averages can be deceiving. Also, one has to consider the number of shots each player took. Dalton took his fair share.

                WLU had 8 players who scored 15 or more points at least once during the season, so that, in addition to their individual offensive efficiency stats, supports the assertion that wlu is loaded with scorers. This is a great advantage when one is having an off night.

                Comment



                • FYI Newcomer profile - Dante Spadafora

                  High School: Electrifying 4-time All-Pennsylvania point guard led Our Lady of the Sacred Heart to unbeaten WPIAL and PIAA state championship season as a senior. …Averaged nearly 20 points per game while stuffing the stat sheets with 5.7 assists, 4.8 rebounds and 4.7 steals a night. …Finished career with more than 1,700 points. He is majoring in Business Administration.

                  IMHO Notes:
                  - Unusually complete player who can score inside and out, dribble, pass, and rebound.
                  - Member of Pittsburgh Post Gazette Fab 5, which are top 5 players in Western PA, across all classifications.
                  https://www.post-gazette.com/sports/...s/202104110085

                  - Four year starter; never lost a game at home. His team became only the 10th team to 3-peat as WPIAL champs in 122 years! Many thought 2A OLSH was best team in WPIAL across all classifications
                  - Driven to win - "failure is not an option" mindset
                  - Stated goal is to lead WLU to a national title during his career
                  - Third team all state as a freshman and soph, 1st team as junior and senior
                  - High school team played similar style to WLU
                  - Had D1 offers
                  - True point guard, who has great court vision.
                  - Aggressive passer with great touch to fit ball into tight windows, even at long distances
                  - Great range and accuracy on three point shot; can finish at the rim
                  - Very high, roadrunner-level motor who plays at 100%, regardless of the score
                  - Makes good decisions in real time in transition
                  - Unselfish; could have averaged 30 points a game, but distributed ball to talented teammates
                  - Tenacious defender; long arms and lightning-quick hand speed creates clean steals, intimidating opposing point guards
                  - Very fast
                  - Just needs time to adjust his game and style to speed and talent of the college game
                  - here are highlights from Springdale game. Dante is #11.
                  https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=BXmueOsOUmM

                  Long-term Assessment
                  - Combination of skill, athletic ability, and drive could make him a special point guard who also maximizes his teammates' potential
                  - Ceiling extremely high
                  - Needs time to adjust to college game, just like any freshman

                  Comment


                  • Fyi Dalton Bolon named the 2021 national men's D2 scholar athlete across all sports!
                    Congratulations Dalton!


                    https://hilltoppersports.com/news/20...-the-year.aspx


                    Comment


                    • FYI Newcomer profile - Austin Webb


                      High School:
                      two-time All-Ohio Division III All-District and All-Conference shooting guard who battled through injuries during his junior and senior year at South Point (Ohio). A 1,000-point scorer who led the Ohio Valley Conference in scoring (21.1 ppg.) as a junior, he also led the team in rebounding with 7.5 boards per game.

                      Coach Howlett says: "Austin is a silky smooth southpaw shooter who has great range but can score at all three levels and guard multiple positions. He's extremely easy to play with and with his skill set, he's a great fit for our system."

                      IMHO Notes:
                      - Unusually complete player who can score inside and out, dribble, pass, and rebound.
                      - incredibly smooth shooting mechanics
                      - good vertical jump
                      - started out as a post player in 9th grade and changed his game to a guard
                      - not rattled by older, stronger college players
                      - gym rat - High school coach Wise:
                      • “He’s not content where he is,” Wise said. “He’s always trying to get better. He’s a great kid who takes coaching well. He’d be in the gym at 6 a.m. He never misses a workout, he’s a gym rat and character-wide he’s as good as there is.”
                      • “He’s worked his butt off all the way up. Never missed an open gym, never missed a workout. Just a great ballplayer and the ceiling, he’s still got room to grow. He’s always in early and stays late. If we had 12 of him, our job (as coaches) would be a lot easier.”
                      • “He comes in early. We come in at 6 o’clock in the morning and he calls and says, ‘can I get in early?’ Three days a week he’s coming at 6 o’clock in the morning working on his shot. He just works hard.”
                      • Besides being a good player, Wise said Webb is a leader by example and should have a lasting effect on the Pointers’ program and he will do the same for West Liberty. “I told Coach Howlett you’re getting a kid who is a gym rat. He loves to be in the gym and he loves to get better,” said Wise. “And he still has something to prove. As a player, he still thinks there’s room for him to grow. That’s what I like about him. He’s not content to be where he is right now. He’s a great kid to have in the program and hopefully the younger kids will see that and work to get better.”

                      - high basketball iq - ball does not stick in his hands
                      - valedictorian of his class
                      - chose wlu over Fairmont and many MEC schools
                      - walk on offers from D1
                      - Needs to get stronger. The weight room upgrade at WLU is already reaping results.
                      - Just needs time to adjust to speed and talent of the college game

                      Long-term Assessment
                      - has not touched his long term potential, as injuries reduced his play in high school
                      - work ethic reminiscent of Bolon
                      - Combination of work ethic and intelligence will enable him to reach a high level of play before he leaves wlu

                      Comment


                      • The Case for Redshirting Talented Basketball Players
                        Coaches may choose to redshirt freshmen basketball players who are very talented from a basketball skills perspective. At WLU, Dalton Bolon (All-American), Will Yoakum (Freshman All American and All conference), Luke Dyer, and Marlon Moore, Jr. all redshirted their freshman year. Even Trevor Hudgins of NWMSU redshirted his freshman year and he is a 2-time national player of the year. However, that was in the age of the one-year waiting period for transfers.

                        In today’s world of the transfer portal, immediate gratification, and unscrupulous people tampering with other team’s players and enticing them to transfer, redshirting is a strategy that is not without risk.

                        The success of redshirting depends on whether the athlete has a long-term or short-term perspective for their goals.
                        Most athletes were superstars at the high school level and were constantly told they were going to set the world on fire at the college level. It is a big adjustment to sit in the street clothes for a year and watch the games, especially when they are very talented and could start at many other schools.


                        However, if the athlete takes a long-term view, with a goal to maximizing their chances to be able to play after college, redshirting can be very beneficial.
                        1. If the school plays a style that aligns well with their likely future professional league aspirations, it is in their best interest to remain and accept the redshirt. For example, European leagues prefer players who are complete players and play a team game. WLU plays a style that is well-suited for these leagues, as they have placed at least 14 players in various professional leagues.
                        2. One of the biggest adjustments between high school and college is the physical nature of the game. Older college players are stronger and they know how to use that strength to their advantage. For example, at WLU, if one compares the strength of Viktor, a grad student transfer, with a talented freshman of similar size, it becomes apparent that Viktor will dominate inside. The freshman will just bounce off him. The same could be said of Patrick Robinson III dominating an incoming freshman. He is just too strong for most college guards.
                        3. The sophisticated college strength and conditioning programs make a huge difference over 4 years. As a result, the body of a 23-year-old senior is so much stronger than that of an incoming 18-year-old. A redshirt player gets to spend much more time in the strength and conditioning program, which pays huge dividends in his junior and senior years. Compare the Dalton Bolon as a freshman and Dalton Bolon as a redshirt senior. Originally a three-point sniper, he got so much stronger and he became a complete player, who can rebound and score inside after contact. He did not arrive as a ballyhooed sure-fire star. He made himself an All-American player. No one remembers or cares that he redshirted his freshman year.
                        4. A freshman may be talented offensively, but may give up too many points defensively. Just like football coaches challenged the opposition’s freshman cornerback, basketball coaches will attack young players with various plays to get mismatches involving the young player.
                        5. Depth of talent – There may not be enough minutes to share that would give a freshman meaningful growth during their freshman year. The redshirt year gives them time to adjust to the game during practice, without wasting a year of eligibility. This pays huge dividends in their performance as a senior, when they are a strong, 23-year-old man who is playing the game.

                        Comment


                        • Originally posted by Columbuseer View Post
                          The Case for Redshirting Talented Basketball Players

                          Coaches may choose to redshirt freshmen basketball players who are very talented from a basketball skills perspective. At WLU, Dalton Bolon (All-American), Will Yoakum (Freshman All American and All conference), Luke Dyer, and Marlon Moore, Jr. all redshirted their freshman year. Even Trevor Hudgins of NWMSU redshirted his freshman year and he is a 2-time national player of the year. However, that was in the age of the one-year waiting period for transfers.

                          In today’s world of the transfer portal, immediate gratification, and unscrupulous people tampering with other team’s players and enticing them to transfer, redshirting is a strategy that is not without risk.

                          The success of redshirting depends on whether the athlete has a long-term or short-term perspective for their goals.
                          Most athletes were superstars at the high school level and were constantly told they were going to set the world on fire at the college level. It is a big adjustment to sit in the street clothes for a year and watch the games, especially when they are very talented and could start at many other schools.


                          However, if the athlete takes a long-term view, with a goal to maximizing their chances to be able to play after college, redshirting can be very beneficial.
                          1. If the school plays a style that aligns well with their likely future professional league aspirations, it is in their best interest to remain and accept the redshirt. For example, European leagues prefer players who are complete players and play a team game. WLU plays a style that is well-suited for these leagues, as they have placed at least 14 players in various professional leagues.
                          2. One of the biggest adjustments between high school and college is the physical nature of the game. Older college players are stronger and they know how to use that strength to their advantage. For example, at WLU, if one compares the strength of Viktor, a grad student transfer, with a talented freshman of similar size, it becomes apparent that Viktor will dominate inside. The freshman will just bounce off him. The same could be said of Patrick Robinson III dominating an incoming freshman. He is just too strong for most college guards.
                          3. The sophisticated college strength and conditioning programs make a huge difference over 4 years. As a result, the body of a 23-year-old senior is so much stronger than that of an incoming 18-year-old. A redshirt player gets to spend much more time in the strength and conditioning program, which pays huge dividends in his junior and senior years. Compare the Dalton Bolon as a freshman and Dalton Bolon as a redshirt senior. Originally a three-point sniper, he got so much stronger and he became a complete player, who can rebound and score inside after contact. He did not arrive as a ballyhooed sure-fire star. He made himself an All-American player. No one remembers or cares that he redshirted his freshman year.
                          4. A freshman may be talented offensively, but may give up too many points defensively. Just like football coaches challenged the opposition’s freshman cornerback, basketball coaches will attack young players with various plays to get mismatches involving the young player.
                          5. Depth of talent – There may not be enough minutes to share that would give a freshman meaningful growth during their freshman year. The redshirt year gives them time to adjust to the game during practice, without wasting a year of eligibility. This pays huge dividends in their performance as a senior, when they are a strong, 23-year-old man who is playing the game.
                          Players on WLU 2021-22 roster who played as true freshmen far exceeds the number of players who did not play:

                          Malik Mckinney, Seton Hill, started 24 games, averaged 28 minutes per game and 11.2 PPG
                          Brycer Butler, WLU, played in all 31 games, averaged 21 MPG and 8.5 PPG
                          Elija Watson, WLU, played in all 23 games with 18 starts, averaged 11.3 MPG and 3.7 PPG
                          Garrett Denbow, Univ of Charleston, played in 12 games, averaged 11 MPG and 4.5 PPG
                          Marlon Moore, WLU, played in 23 games, averaged 8.3 MPG and 4.1 PPG
                          Patrick Robinson, Holy Family, started all 27 games, averaged 37.7 MPG and 18.7 PPG
                          Ben Sarson, WLU, played in 13 games, averaged 8.5 MPG and 4.0 PPG
                          Zach Rasile, WLU, played in all 23 games including 1 start, averaged 15 MPG and 6.8 PPG

                          Excluding this years freshman class, 8 of the 12 players on WLU's roster played as true freshmen with 5 of those 8 playing at WLU.

                          Not saying all or any of the 3 incoming freshmen will or won't play this coming season, but WLU does not shy away from true freshmen playing...if they are physically and mentally ready to play. Over the years, WLU has had a number of True Freshmen that played and wen't on to have remarkable careers...Among them:

                          Segar Bonifant (ultimate DII POY and All-American)
                          Dave Dennis (DII Freshman of the Year and ultimate All-American)
                          Beau Justice (ultimate All-American)
                          Brady Arnold
                          Clay Guillozet
                          CJ Hester

                          Comment


                          • Originally posted by boatcapt View Post
                            Players on WLU 2021-22 roster who played as true freshmen far exceeds the number of players who did not play:

                            Malik Mckinney, Seton Hill, started 24 games, averaged 28 minutes per game and 11.2 PPG
                            Brycer Butler, WLU, played in all 31 games, averaged 21 MPG and 8.5 PPG
                            Elija Watson, WLU, played in all 23 games with 18 starts, averaged 11.3 MPG and 3.7 PPG
                            Garrett Denbow, Univ of Charleston, played in 12 games, averaged 11 MPG and 4.5 PPG
                            Marlon Moore, WLU, played in 23 games, averaged 8.3 MPG and 4.1 PPG
                            Patrick Robinson, Holy Family, started all 27 games, averaged 37.7 MPG and 18.7 PPG
                            Ben Sarson, WLU, played in 13 games, averaged 8.5 MPG and 4.0 PPG
                            Zach Rasile, WLU, played in all 23 games including 1 start, averaged 15 MPG and 6.8 PPG

                            Excluding this years freshman class, 8 of the 12 players on WLU's roster played as true freshmen with 5 of those 8 playing at WLU.

                            Not saying all or any of the 3 incoming freshmen will or won't play this coming season, but WLU does not shy away from true freshmen playing...if they are physically and mentally ready to play. Over the years, WLU has had a number of True Freshmen that played and wen't on to have remarkable careers...Among them:

                            Segar Bonifant (ultimate DII POY and All-American)
                            Dave Dennis (DII Freshman of the Year and ultimate All-American)
                            Beau Justice (ultimate All-American)
                            Brady Arnold
                            Clay Guillozet
                            CJ Hester
                            Wow you bring back memories of so many great players!

                            I think what your post clearly points out is that most coaches will always play folks that are clearly in the top group of players, regardless of their class, if the player can help them win.

                            Whether a true freshman can help them win depends on:
                            1) their skill and how quickly they can adapt to the college game in general, and the wlu style in particular
                            2) the skill and proven experience of the older players already on the roster.
                            3) Do they fill a gap or niche that helps the team win?

                            I think David Dennis Jr. was Division IV Player of the Year in high school and may have started as a freshman. He was so advanced as a point guard.
                            Beau Justice was a finalist for Ohio Mr. Basketball and averaged 33 points a game. He was a team player, but could take over a game in high school. As a freshman, he was often guarding the opponent's top guard. What a hard worker. He may have become the all-time leading scorer in Valdosta State history (not 100% sure).
                            Just to name a few.


                            Like you, I am not saying who will or won't redshirt.
                            I was looking at the advantages of a redshirt year from the player's perspective, trying to point out that it is not doom and gloom for them if they cannot earn significant playing time. IMHO, the challenge for freshman on this year's team is found in the current players that are on the list that you mentioned. So many were good enough to play as true freshman and now have the advantage of college experience.

                            This year's lineup is a hard lineup for anyone to crack as a freshman.

                            However, it can be hard for players with high accolades to be patient, when they may have had serious interest from D1 schools or other high performing D2 schools. They just need to think long-term and trust the process.

                            Comment


                            • West Liberty got a good one yesterday. 21'-22 senior Luke Denbow, brother of Garrett committed to the Hilltoppers last night. Kid's a star. Will be a 4 year varsity starter, should leave Ashland as the all time leading scorer. Quick, explosive guard on both ends of the floor. Big get for WL.

                              Comment

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