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  • Originally posted by iupgroundhog View Post
    I think the stackable credentials/more adult education/workforce development is a good idea. I would go big-time, make it a program across all 14 schools i.e. statewide, and develop a formal relationship with the Department of Labor.

    It's a competitive market (just like the online deal is for the west schools). If they can cut costs while developing new sources of revenue that will help.

    If you're talking programs like FS82 mentioned (data analytics, project management) you also have to consider that Bloom-Lock Haven-Mansfield is located amidst a rural economy. How much local demand is there for these offerings?
    In higher ed, stackable credentials are what I mentioned. I think it spells an end for the MBA in the long run. If distance ed is the teaching format, they can market that throughout eastern PA. If classroom learning is the primary format, it will have to be extra sensitive to the local market. There's an interesting book on this stuff, "There Is Life After College" about the future of work and the disconnect between traditional degree programs and the changing needs of the workforce. I don't know exactly what that would look like. 5-10 years ago I would have said something with oil & gas but they've largely cut & run (maybe drilled & run) from the region.

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    • Originally posted by Fightingscot82 View Post

      In higher ed, stackable credentials are what I mentioned. I think it spells an end for the MBA in the long run. If distance ed is the teaching format, they can market that throughout eastern PA. If classroom learning is the primary format, it will have to be extra sensitive to the local market. There's an interesting book on this stuff, "There Is Life After College" about the future of work and the disconnect between traditional degree programs and the changing needs of the workforce. I don't know exactly what that would look like. 5-10 years ago I would have said something with oil & gas but they've largely cut & run (maybe drilled & run) from the region.
      I'm not sure that marketing this stuff beyond the northcentral region is part of that plan. The language used by PASSHE is all about supporting the regional economy. In SEPA, I think this market is saturated. PASSHE might be able to undercut the Villanovas, the Penns, the St. Joes, and Temples on price, who knows. Not to mention private companies that provide these courses. A lot of it is also sponsored by large companies so PASSHE will have to pry these group sales away from more trusted institutions.

      As for fracking, I believe Mansfield put together a fracking certificate program, maybe even a major. It was quickly overrun by PSU which the employers bought into.

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      • Originally posted by iupgroundhog View Post

        I'm not sure that marketing this stuff beyond the northcentral region is part of that plan. The language used by PASSHE is all about supporting the regional economy. In SEPA, I think this market is saturated. PASSHE might be able to undercut the Villanovas, the Penns, the St. Joes, and Temples on price, who knows. Not to mention private companies that provide these courses. A lot of it is also sponsored by large companies so PASSHE will have to pry these group sales away from more trusted institutions.

        As for fracking, I believe Mansfield put together a fracking certificate program, maybe even a major. It was quickly overrun by PSU which the employers bought into.
        I think you're right. PASSHE will have to think outside the box - and in some ways they already are - so they'll have to get aggressive with pricing and marketing, something more typical for a regional private school trying to improve its profile. Maybe its time to charge undergrad rates for what is technically grad education. Or maybe instead of having faculty create without demonstrated demand (how we got to the excess degree programs issue) they'll take a needs assessment of regional employers then put it on faculty to create.

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        • Just listened to a podcast that did a short segment on "stackable credentials." One thing that I didn't consider is that they can be industry specific. One industry they see rapidly changing is logistics. A logistics or supply chain certificate could give the minimal training needed for a delivery driver to transition to a supervisory role. I imagine this could also be done for manufacturing. North-Central PA is littered with small tool & die shops mostly staffed by workers without a college degree.

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          • Originally posted by Fightingscot82 View Post
            Just listened to a podcast that did a short segment on "stackable credentials." One thing that I didn't consider is that they can be industry specific. One industry they see rapidly changing is logistics. A logistics or supply chain certificate could give the minimal training needed for a delivery driver to transition to a supervisory role. I imagine this could also be done for manufacturing. North-Central PA is littered with small tool & die shops mostly staffed by workers without a college degree.
            Oh, I think it's a great idea, enabling the schools to reach out and expand into the private sector/labor market as well as engage in cooperative arrangements with governmental and quasi-governmental groups. It's going to create revenue.

            The other positive thing is, in most cases, the payer is the employer. It also fills a gap for unemployed, underemployed, displaced workers, etc. and the payer for that is the state of PA.

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            • Originally posted by iupgroundhog View Post

              Oh, I think it's a great idea, enabling the schools to reach out and expand into the private sector/labor market as well as engage in cooperative arrangements with governmental and quasi-governmental groups. It's going to create revenue.

              The other positive thing is, in most cases, the payer is the employer. It also fills a gap for unemployed, underemployed, displaced workers, etc. and the payer for that is the state of PA.
              Offering technical credentials/certificates is a proven avenue to financial success...AND failure! Credential training is a CROWDED field that lives and dies largely on cost and duration of the training. I liken these courses sort of to "Community Education" classes at local CC's but with the benefit of a job related certification...I want to take a wine appreciation class but I'm not willing to pay MORE to attend school B over A OR take a 10 week course over a 2 week one.

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              • Originally posted by Bart View Post
                "California, Clarion and Edinboro universities would function as a single unit specializing in online education, and Bloomsburg, Lock Haven and Mansfield would focus on stackable and nondegree credentials, PASSHE officials have said. "


                https://www.educationdive.com/news/p...m-cuts/588220/

                What would a nondegree credential include? EMT, CPR, fracking equipment, CDL, lifeguard certification? You don't need a university for certificates.
                Hehehehehe...Just envisioned a 65 year old tenured professor "teaching" a class of 18'somthings how to use a torpedo buoy or how to break a death grip of a drowning victim!!

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                • Originally posted by Fightingscot82 View Post

                  Financial and geographic access are the #1 drivers of PASSHE enrollment.

                  I can't find the data to accurately cite, but most students attending PASSHE schools are from within 50-75 miles of campus. So when IUP cuts art programs that doesn't necessarily mean that Edinboro benefits. When Clarion and Edinboro cut music programs, the enrollment in music programs at IUP and Slippery Rock didn't increase.

                  The only variable that will increase enrollment is reducing cost (increasing the savings from state related branches and regional privates). Reducing locations will reduce enrollment.
                  Are they attending because they are the closest school to offer that degree or is it a burning desire to stay close to home? If the school within 50-75 miles didn't offer the degree they chose but one 150 miles away did, would they opt to go there instead?

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                  • Originally posted by Fightingscot82 View Post
                    Just listened to a podcast that did a short segment on "stackable credentials." One thing that I didn't consider is that they can be industry specific. One industry they see rapidly changing is logistics. A logistics or supply chain certificate could give the minimal training needed for a delivery driver to transition to a supervisory role. I imagine this could also be done for manufacturing. North-Central PA is littered with small tool & die shops mostly staffed by workers without a college degree.
                    Bloom offers a degree in Supply Chain Management, so they can take that one.

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                    • 'Have a look at the goals and objectives toward which they are designing. This is not today’s university they are building, it is tomorrow’s. Where to begin? How about with the goal of reducing by 25% (that’s a quarter) the net average price a student pays for their postsecondary education?'

                      https://www.calu.edu/news/2020/syste...-november.aspx

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                      • Originally posted by complaint_hopeful View Post
                        'Have a look at the goals and objectives toward which they are designing. This is not today’s university they are building, it is tomorrow’s. Where to begin? How about with the goal of reducing by 25% (that’s a quarter) the net average price a student pays for their postsecondary education?'

                        https://www.calu.edu/news/2020/syste...-november.aspx
                        Its essentially like some of the big community college systems in California.

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                        • Originally posted by ironmaniup View Post

                          Its essentially like some of the big community college systems in California.
                          They have to be planning to lay off some decent percentage of employees to hit this goal.

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                          • Originally posted by complaint_hopeful View Post

                            They have to be planning to lay off some decent percentage of employees to hit this goal.
                            That and perhaps 'lay off' some sports programs.

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                            • I've got to wonder about the effect this is having with current HS seniors. I don't know if my short list would include a school which might be facing merger.

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                              • Originally posted by jrshooter View Post
                                I've got to wonder about the effect this is having with current HS seniors. I don't know if my short list would include a school which might be facing merger.
                                I would think a certain percent wont want to. I dont know though. Tons of press out of this...both good and bad.

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